Deborah Maine
Professor of International Health, School of Public Health, Boston University

Deborah Maine participated in the World Leaders Forum event, Taking a Stand: Challenges and Controversies in Reproductive Health, Maternal Mortality, and HIV/AIDS, in June 2006.

Deborah Maine is an epidemiologist with a background in anthropology. She has been working in the area of women's reproductive health in developing countries for nearly 30 years, most of them at the School of Public Health at Columbia University. For the last 20 years she has focused on maternal mortality and morbidity. During that time, she directed two international programs. The Prevention of Maternal Mortality Program, funded by the Carnegie Corporation, had 11 multidisciplinary teams in West Africa. The Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program, funded by the Gates Foundation, supported projects in more than 50 countries. Both of these projects are continuing and growing under new leaders.

In June 2005, Deborah joined the faculty of Boston University's School of Public Health.

Participated In

Taking a Stand: Challenges and Controversies in Reproductive Health, Maternal Mortality, and HIV/AIDS

Date: June 8, 2006 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Location: Roone Arledge Auditorium, Alfred Lerner Hall
Description:
A Symposium in Honor of Allan Rosenfield and His Four Decades of Bold Leadership in Public Health


 


This World Leaders Forum program addresses public health issues of profound global importance-issues directly related to the Millennium Development Goals. Dr. Allan Rosenfield, Dean of the Mailman School of Public Health, has pioneered innovative programs in reproductive health, maternal mortality, and the treatment of HIV-infected women, men and children. He has advanced the health and human rights of populations around the world. Presentations and discussions featured foremost public health and policy experts from major international health organizations, the United Nations, leading academic institutions, and distinguished faculty from the Mailman School of Public Health.